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Practice Name

Boyette Animal Hospital

Primary Location
10931 Boyette Road
Riverview, FL 33569
Phone: 813-671-3400

Office Hours

DayOpenClosed
Monday7:00am7:00pm
Tuesday7:00am7:00pm
Wednesday7:00am7:00pm
Thursday7:00am7:00pm
Friday7:00am6:30pm
Saturday8:00am4:00pm
Sunday5pm to 7pmBoarding Only
Main Content

Cystitis
Clinton Cotten, DVM

 What is cystitis? Cystitis means inflammation of the bladder, and the term is used as a general description for any urinary problems.

What causes cystitis?

The most common cause of cystitis in dogs is an infection caused by bacteria. Other common causes include bladder stones, tumors or polyps in the bladder, and abnormal anatomy. Some dogs will experience interstitial or "sterile cystitis", a condition that causes inflammation and associated clinical signs without any infection.

What are the signs of cystitis?

The most common sign is blood in the urine. Cystitis causes discomfort and pain. Dogs with cystitis may spend several minutes squatting and straining to produce only a small amount of urine. Bacterial infections, bladder stones, and excessive amounts of crystalline minerals in the urine all cause irritation to the bladder wall. In severe cases, the bladder stones may block the urethra and obstruct the flow of urine, which is a potentially life-threatening condition. Tumors or polyps are usually not irritating to the bladder, but they can cause bleeding and straining to urinate. A urethral diverticulum is an abnormal anatomical defect consisting of a small pouch in the wall of the bladder or urethra. Bacteria can easily get into this protective pouch and set up an infection that is extremely difficult to treat without surgical removal of the pouch.

How is cystitis diagnosed?

The first group of tests includes urinalysis, urine culture, and feeling bladder for stones. A urinalysis consists of several tests to detect abnormalities in the urine and urine sediment. These are generally adequate to confirm cystitis, but they may not tell us the exact cause. A urine culture and sensitivity determines if bacteria are present and what antibiotics are likely to be effective in killing them. This is often indicated because bacteria cause most cases of cystitis in the dog and usually eliminated easily with the appropriate antibiotic.

Bladder radiographs (x-rays) the bladder for common types of bladder stones.

Ultrasound visualizes stones as well as some tumors and polyps.

If a dog shows other signs of illness, such as increased production of urine, fever, poor appetite, or lethargy, cystitis may be a symptom of a more serious problem. Biochemistry profile and complete blood count (CBC) should be performed to assess metabolic and organ function. The most common diseases that can cause cystitis as a secondary problem are diabetes mellitus, Cushing's disease, and kidney disease.

How is cystitis treated?

Bacterial infections are generally treated with antibiotics. Some bladder stones can be dissolved with special diets or surgical removal. Benign bladder polyps can usually be surgically removed, but malignant bladder tumors are difficult to treat successfully. Pain relief or anti-inflammatory medications to relieve discomfort and improve urine outflow.

 

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Feature Articles

Community Vaccine Clinic Learn more about a better alternative to low cost, parking lot vaccine events. Angie's List Award Boyette Animal Hospital has earned the service industry’s coveted Angie’s List Super Service Award ...

Testimonial

I can't express how Thankful I am for the Doctors and staff here. I brought my chihuahua "son" in yesterday for a check up after being attacked by a neighbors large dog earlier in the week. As usual, we both were treated with great care and concern as I also was a bit emotional. This is a place were the staff Truly care about animals/pets. I wouldn't take my fur babies Anywhere else and have referred my friends multiple times.

- Angie W. / Riverview, FL

Office Hours

DayOpenClosed
Monday7:00am7:00pm
Tuesday7:00am7:00pm
Wednesday7:00am7:00pm
Thursday7:00am7:00pm
Friday7:00am6:30pm
Saturday8:00am4:00pm
Sunday5pm to 7pmBoarding Only

Meet the Veterinarians

Meet The Team Dr.Bob Encinosa was born in Valrico, Florida and graduated from Brandon High School in 1980. He received his doctorate from the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine in 1987.Read More

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